A forum for family, friends and carers of pancreatic cancer patients

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toodotty
Posts: 151
Joined: Sat Jun 09, 2018 4:17 pm

Re: This cruel disease

Postby toodotty » Sun Nov 04, 2018 10:06 am

Thank you both for signing the petition and passing it on. No wonder the survival rates are so terrible when 70% of people receive no treatment at all.
Keithkerry, you are at the stage I am rapidly approaching, what happens when I get past round 12 of Folfirinox? Having had to fight so hard to get treatment I am terrified of falling off the radar and not getting treatment quickly the second time around if the disease should come back aggressively again. I do feel perhaps because most people died before this stage that many Oncologists hit a bit of an impasse at this point because they do not have the requisite experience of PC. I am considering changing to a specialist PC centre who might be more up with the latest thinking, though this will be horribly disruptive if I have to travel to say Leeds for treatment. I am discussing this with my GP on Tuesday to see her thoughts.
And yes Kate I am in active dialogue with Dr Donoway in the US. What I like about him is that he views the disease holistically and looks to treat the whole body not just the pancreas. The Y-90 treatment for multiple liver lesions sounds really promising, and his views on diet and exercise resonates completely. I have learnt so much from his posts and his compassion towards other sufferers, I am really impressed by this. I will be posting something on the Nanoknife warriors website about my decision making process, there is still a possibility of the closed procedure in London after Round 12 but feel that this may not be the best option now.
And for the publicity, me brave, no I am just angry! I am horrified that this is the best that we can expect from the NHS. People are dying due to administrative errors, ignorance of condition by the medical profession and the false belief by our politicians that we are at the forefront of cancer treatment in the UK. Poppy-cock, we are about 5 years behind everyone else and falling even more behind with NICE being our silent enemy too.
There is still hope for all of us, but we are not likely to find it in this country at the moment.

Erika (toodotty)

KeithKerry
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:44 pm

Re: This cruel disease

Postby KeithKerry » Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:22 pm

We are fortunate that our hospital is the regional centre for Pancreatic Cancer (and other Cancers). It's on our doorstep (my Wife and I have worked there for many years in admin roles). I do know that our MDT that covers PC meets every week to follow up on all patients and to make sure that they are all having the same level of treatment, depending on staging and suitability (or not) for surgery.

I think that if we can just get my Daughter's CA19-9 measured regularly she will stop fretting so much. She has no symptoms at all. Her hair is growing back rapidly and she has a voracious appetite. But she is constantly worrying that the cancer is going to wake up and start spreading again. Just having that one piece of monitoring done will make a big difference to how much she can enjoy this treatment break.

What a nightmare. So much to think about for the future. Most of it I don't want to think about until I'm forced to. For now I have to be the rock that my Daughter and my Grandchildren can look to for help and encouragement.

I can tell you as a long time employee that the NHS is indeed a mess in some ways, but it's all we've got at the moment. I do see so much good done in the hospital that I work in. But there is never enough medical staff and nothing like enough admin staff to run all of the theatres, wards and clinics. It is demoralising for the staff to have to see long waiting lists and to have unhappy patients.

A lot of people that work for the NHS really do care immensely. What the NHS badly needs is much larger investment and a good shake up of the senior management.

Dee123
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2018 8:21 pm

Re: This cruel disease

Postby Dee123 » Sun Dec 16, 2018 11:18 pm

Hi Keith. How is your daughter doing? Have you had any news on what happens next after her break? I hope you and your daughter and family are doing well.

KeithKerry
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:44 pm

Re: This cruel disease

Postby KeithKerry » Sat Dec 22, 2018 10:52 am

Hi Dee

We had a mixture of news from the scan. The primary tumour is still dormant and much smaller than it was. Some lymph nodes have returned to normal (that was a real boost!) but there are signs of either fresh growth in her liver or regrowth of original cells that were too small to see on the scan in late August.

We have an appointment on 24th December to see what happens next. Ideally she will go back to the first line treatment (Gemcitabine/Abraxane) as it was still working and the break in treatment was supposedly just that. A break. But there is so much conflicting information out there about that. Some people say you can have it "indefinitely" until the inevitable failure. Other people say that you can have <insert number> of rounds of a particular treatment and then that's it. It's a horrific thought that a treatment that is still working would be withheld based on a set figure. But we shall see.

On Kerry's care plan she has an initial two lines of treatment. She is still in very good health, has a very healthy appetite and literally leads a normal life that is virtually free of symptoms. She doesn't even have any diarrhea (that is the worlds hardest word to spell. I gave up trying to type the British English version!)

I have kept a detailed diary since March. One overriding theme is that it is incredibly difficult to get to see people to ask questions. We have had to chase more recent appointments and for this most recent scan at the end of the 3 month break we had to make complete nuisances of ourselves to even get one booked. We have our Specialist Nurse, but to say that they are a "thin blue line" would be an understatement. She gives us whatever answers she can, but is honest enough to tell us that she can't answer questions outside of her field of expertise.

We shall see what happens on Monday. I will let you know.

toodotty
Posts: 151
Joined: Sat Jun 09, 2018 4:17 pm

Re: This cruel disease

Postby toodotty » Sat Dec 22, 2018 7:24 pm

Hi KeithKerry,
Good luck for Monday. I did post a reply yesterday which seems to have got lost. If you want to contact me direct about Nanoknife, then please ask the nurses to pass on my email address. I am more than happy to share what experiences I have had.

Erika

Dee123
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2018 8:21 pm

Re: This cruel disease

Postby Dee123 » Sun Dec 23, 2018 2:47 pm

Hi Keith, sounds like mixed results from the scan but overall good news that she is in good health with a healthy appetite and leading a normal life.

We have been told that my mum can continue on the same chemo indefinitely but we will see what happens. She is hoping to be offered a break next month after the second set of chemo ends in January but that will depend on the CT scan result.

Good luck for tomorrow!

KeithKerry
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:44 pm

Re: This cruel disease

Postby KeithKerry » Mon Dec 24, 2018 4:24 pm

Well, that wasn't as bad as I was dreading.

The 2nd line treatment is indeed Folfirinox of some variety but we are lucky enough to have got a place on a trial that has 50 % chance of including a second experimental active ingredient AM0010 which is a trial of immunotherapy, which I'm very excited about.

When we saw a Geneticist just after Kerry was diagnosed in March 2018 I was praying that she was BRCA1 or BRCA2 positive as that may have opened up the option of immunotherapy. She wasn't, so that was out of the picture. But now it seems as if she has 50% chance of having something along those lines again. There has been some very promising results in some people with regard to slowing the cancer down significantly.

There are no guarantees of course, as we all know with all of these treatments. There are risks with this trial, particularly with pancreatic enzymes being affected plus other side effects and concerns about Neutropenia which may mean that she cannot tolerate the treatment. But she is young and still strong and surprisingly well. Those things count in her favour considerably. I just hope that she is in the lucky 50%.

When either this treatment stops working, or doesn't prove to be effective or Kerry cannot tolerate it, they will consider putting her back on Gemcitabine again. I was mightily relieved to hear that having that again was at least a possibility in the future.

I asked about Nanoknife and got the answer that I was fully expecting. That type of treatment is only appropriate for a primary tumour that has not spread. I think we all get told that but I won't give up that easily.

<I had to edit this post as I was incorrect in thinking that it was two drugs - Folfirinox, plus another drug plus 50% chance of Immunotherapy - pardon my "senior moment">

Thank you to everybody for the kind wishes and messages of support. I hope you all enjoy Christmas as best as you possibly can. We will be doing so. Then we carry on fighting the good fight!


Thank you to all for your messages of support and kind wishes.

Theresa Upton
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:39 pm

Re: This cruel disease

Postby Theresa Upton » Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:06 pm

Hi Keith, how is your daughter doing, has she started the trail yet?


My thoughts and best wishes are with you


Theresa