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Dandygal76
Posts: 736
Joined: Sat Mar 12, 2016 9:49 am

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby Dandygal76 » Wed Sep 21, 2016 8:22 pm

Hey Mo, it is lovely to hear of your impromptu drive with Peter and I hope he is feeling a bit better in both mind and body after the insulin solution and the sea air.

Beautiful treasured memories is definitely the order of the day.

I hope you are doing okay in yourself and get some better sleep tonight and some more gym time in tomorrow.

xxx

Justamo
Posts: 463
Joined: Sun Sep 04, 2016 9:38 pm

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby Justamo » Wed Sep 21, 2016 9:46 pm

Hey DG, nice to hear from you.

A good-ish day today and the postman brought two more hospital appointments: one for the eye clinic (Peter has wet macular degeneration which necessitates injection into his eye every two months. The other appointment is to see the cancer dietician tomorrow. We hear on the grapevine that there are three dieticians at the hospital.

There's the Fat Dietician, who gave us a little book when we saw her, there's the Cancer Dietician who we are seeing tomorrow, and there's the Gastrointestinal Dietician who we haven't seen at all. Evidently they cordially dislike each other and contradict one another all the time. I imagine there's an element of exaggeration in this story, and since I've had the usual comprehensive advice from our PC nurses, along with Creon and medication info and some further help from forum members I'm not too bothered.

Our Diabetic Nurse (no, he's not diabetic, but Nurse Specialist Diabetic Practitioner is too long to type when you're fighting with a Google keyboard) rang this morning, asked about sugar levels and hefted up the insulin. (Google just typed insulation)

My Guy has had a good day, I've had the usual busy one. This morning I snapped that I was so busy running his life that I didn't have enough time to run my own, and he fell about laughing. He wants to go and watch some golf but I've told him he's grounded until he can measure his own blood sugar. He does the injections OK. I'm trying to keep everything normal for as long as I can . . . . I'd like him to go with his mates and not trail around after him with my little bag of medications so he's practising. Just so long as he doesn't practice on the cat, that's all.

Hope everyone is OK this evening.
Love and God Bless,
Mo

Justamo
Posts: 463
Joined: Sun Sep 04, 2016 9:38 pm

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby Justamo » Wed Sep 21, 2016 9:59 pm

PS. I would like to share with you the fact that I have just spent five minutes trying to insert a blood test strip into Peter's phone. It is a grandad phone and therefore the same size and shape as the monitor thingy.
Perhaps it's me that shouldn't be allowed out alone.

Proud Wife
Posts: 720
Joined: Sun Jan 17, 2016 9:28 am

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby Proud Wife » Thu Sep 22, 2016 11:10 am

Hi Mo

I use an ACCU-CHEK mobile blood monitor. I bought it myself for around £20-£30 but then the cartridges and needles I get on prescription because I have a wonderful GP!! It is a day and night difference from using strips and Peter would find it so much easier. It's an all in one thing - you prick your finger and then rub the drop of blood on the underside of the transaction and it digitally gives you readings 5 seconds later. You can also download onto PC and it gives you a graph, trends etc of your blood sugars. You don't need to faff around with inserting needles or strips etc - its marvellous!! Google it xx

Veema
Posts: 466
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2015 5:35 pm

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby Veema » Thu Sep 22, 2016 2:40 pm

Oh Mo...you do make me laugh, but really it isn't a laughing situation...

I don't know how this would affect Peters sugar level, but our dietician has given us procal powders...they are amazing, just stir a scoop into almost any food or drink and it instantly adds calories and a bit of protein too without any bulk or change to taste. Nige is really only eating a weetabix and a scandishake a day now, but man am I heaping the procal into the milk for those two things...he'll be a right fat pig before he's done.

Marmalade

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby Marmalade » Thu Sep 22, 2016 5:18 pm

HI Mo,

You have made me laugh. We all have these silly incidents and goodness knows you have to laugh or you would be in tears all the time. I think you are doing incredibly well, I really do.

I agree with PW on the accu-check device and I actually have one and all the expensive needles and test cartridges that I don't need if its of any use. Another useless ornament to me.

Have you though about getting one or two of Peters pals up to speed with his medication so they can support him when he is out? I know you don't want to burden them but at least you could have a bit of reassurance and he could have some time away from matron! I know you are not matron, although sometimes it does feel like it, or at least I thought so, but you know what I mean, the boys do love to be let out by themselves bless them.

My thoughts on hospital appointments is only go if you think they will add value, if they detract from you enjoying yourselves and don't add value, cancel them.

Hope you both have a good day and that Peter passes his sugar testing proficiency test! Much love, M xx

Justamo
Posts: 463
Joined: Sun Sep 04, 2016 9:38 pm

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby Justamo » Thu Sep 22, 2016 7:55 pm

Do you know, you really are the nicest bunch of people. I would have said 'women' but don't want to put off any men who would really like to join in but are frightened that we will all talk about childbirth or periods. We are, of course, PEOPLE first and foremost and our gender is not really significant. Unless you're talking about driving, in which case we are vastly superior.

PW, the AccuChek sounds sensible, but right now I am wary of introducing anything new. This afternoon my patient had a hissy-fit because the DN changed the type of night time insulin, and therefore the colour of the pen changed. It was almost a furniture-kicking event, and if he was 6 I would have sent him to his room to think about his behaviour, but as he is 84 I was obliged to ignore the tantrum. God help him if he does it in Tesco though.

Veema, we saw a really nice dietitian today and she went through my notebook with description of meals and snacks and calories and carbs and fats and Creons and blood sugar readings, and gave me a gold star and a tick. I think she will make me milk monitor next week.

(For those of you who don't remember Mrs T when she was Minister of Education, kids used to get a third of a pint of warm and slighty stale milk every morning at school. Competition was fierce amongst the goody-goodies who wanted to be the ones who gave the milk out. Then the Iron Lady said ENOUGH ! And little children starved in the streets).

Anyway, with a little prompting she upped the Creons (the Dietitian, not the late Mrs T)to include a few extras for snacks, handed me a few leaflets, gave us her blessing and direct telephone number, and ushered us out. When the time comes, and if we need it, I will ask her for procol powders. I have actually printed that bit of your post Veema and stuck it into my little book so that I know what to ask for when my brain won't work for panic and misery.

Marmalade, I don't believe you're real. I think you might be a Bot and have been put on this forum to make us all nicer people by example. The accu-check offer is appreciated, but as I say I daren't make any changes just yet. Unless you can find a good home for it, hang on to it and I'll donate the cost of it to PC Fundraising if I feel able to upgrade My Patient to this year's model and need it from you. But of course, if you find a worthy home please let it go.

The thought of getting one of Peter's mates to supervise the blood testing made me go and have a strong cup of tea and a little lie down in a darkened room. It's a marvellous idea, but most of them are barely fit to tie their own shoelaces, let alone mess about with a sharp instrument and my beloved's fingers. And he won't let them anyway. I got shot down in flames for suggesting that yesterday - all I said was, "I suppose we could always ask Bob to help..." and I received a withering look and a firm refusal. Of course, Peter doesn't do 'ill' and asking for help is akin to questioning his manhood. Bloody caveman.

Meantime I am enjoying his vastly improved appetite. I've said to myself: "OK, so there's double cream in the fridge. So deal with it". But I can't ignore it, I want to keep on sticking my fingers in it, so tonight I whipped it with some vanilla and a touch of sugar and froze it into individual portions. Ergo ! Indulgence in a little plastic pot. He's eating really well, pasta bakes and fried rice and mackerel and mascarpone ice cream - not actually all on the same plate you understand - and he's really enjoying his food.I would be the size of a barrage balloon by now after a week of this. He's gained a bit of weight too, according to the hospital, but we only weigh at home once a week.

Marmalade, your trenchant advice about only attending hospital if we thought it would add value is timely indeed. We have two lots of appointments next week: one for a replacement stent and the other for an endoscopy with ultra sound. We'll certainly go for the stent because we can detect a very slight yellowing in his eyes, but we'll take a rain check on the other procedure. I think we have a new guru in the shape of the diabetic nurse, who is a gem. We'll talk about it to him.

I will stop now otherwise I will clog up the interweb. You're probably all asleep anyway. I'll tell you about the cat's nervous breakdown tomorrow. Unfortunately, he witnessed the aforementioned hissy-fit and went into shock. I think he needs counselling, meantime he's got his nose in a tin of line-caught ethically sourced finest tuna. I've turned into one of those boring women who can only talk about food and their husbands and their cats. . . . . My education was wasted.

Veema, I do hope Nige is comfortable.

God Bless and take care everybody.
Love, Mo

Marmalade

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby Marmalade » Fri Sep 23, 2016 10:26 am

Mo, you are a diamond. I don't laugh much at the moment but you are such a tonic. My man was just the same with not letting anyone do things for him so we have to be sneaky…surely to goodness one of his friends is diabetic? 20% of the population is so there must be one somewhere ha ha ha.

So glad to hear your man is eating well and feeling better. Big hug for you xxx

Ruthus
Posts: 177
Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2015 2:39 pm

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby Ruthus » Fri Sep 23, 2016 11:29 am

Hi Mo

Your posts have also made me chuckle which is nice in the face of the current situation for us all. I hope the blood sugars get easier to control. I have my blood sugars regularly checked and am borderline diabetic. I saw the specialist who explained it is a different type of diabetes and if they looked hard enough and did more tests they could probably give me a diagnosis but did I really want that at current time. I said no I didn't and would just carry on. He said I should look out for blurred vision, generally feeling unwell, excessive thirst and sudden weight loss and if I noticed any of these symptoms I should get checked out.

I appreciate others have to be far more diligent with managing the diabetes and blood sugars and this is very important. It's difficult though getting into a regime. Hopefully it will get easier. Good luck!

Ruth X

Justamo
Posts: 463
Joined: Sun Sep 04, 2016 9:38 pm

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby Justamo » Fri Sep 23, 2016 9:22 pm

I had written, in my head, a rather breathless report of today's excitements but after reading Veema's news I think I will just keep quiet for now. Seems more appropriate somehow.

God grant me the serenity
To accept the things I cannot change,
Courage to change the things I can
And the wisdom to know the difference.

Good night and God bless. Serenity sometimes feels a long way off.
Love, Mo

Marmalade

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby Marmalade » Fri Sep 23, 2016 11:16 pm

Dearest Mo, you are such a sweetheart but we are here for you too. We know you joke and make us all smile but we have no illusions, you are here for the same reason as the rest of us. You write your words in you own wonderful way whenever you want to and we will be here.

M xx

Veema
Posts: 466
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2015 5:35 pm

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby Veema » Sat Sep 24, 2016 6:31 am

Mo...please, please don't not post on my account. Everyone's posts are important and besides, yours make me smile, giggle and even laugh out loud sometimes, which as Marmalade says is a tonic right now.

Vx

sandraW
Posts: 1026
Joined: Thu Oct 31, 2013 5:38 pm

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby sandraW » Sat Sep 24, 2016 8:42 am

Mo, I couldn't agree with V and Marmalade more, your way of telling your story is unique, please post away love sandrax xx

Proud Wife
Posts: 720
Joined: Sun Jan 17, 2016 9:28 am

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby Proud Wife » Sat Sep 24, 2016 1:00 pm

Snap! I'm absolutely loving Justamo's posts as I am her forum name itself. I can just hear Mo saying....just a mo, just a mo, just a mo.....as we probably all do, day in day out!

Mo, you are a legend. You are able to joke in the face of adversity and that's brilliant. I too always laugh and I think this forum needs it's share of humour, given the nature of the beast.

I have been gearing myself up to complete hubby's final wish which was to have his ashes buried at sea. These ashes are far too precious to me to give up entirely so I'm come up with a compromise, to scatter/bury some at sea, to keep some and to have some buried with me when my time comes. I can but pray he approves because I get a lot of comfort by talking to his ashes, stroking the urn and just having "him" in the house with me in any shape or form to be honest.

The only reason I'm talking about this here on Mo's thread (rather than my own) is because the only way I can cope with this is to add humour whenever I can. When he was alive, each morning he call out to me and say "still breathing" or I'd call out to him and ask "are you still breathing. He used to say "I'll tell you when I pop my clogs".

Anyhow, here I am battling my tears at the thought of having to carry him on the ship this time (his final cruise).... in hand luggage, so I thought the only way I can deal with that is to put him in a designer carrier bag, simply because first class travel appealed to him so much, even if our holiday budget would not allow!!

I hope I've not offended anyone by talking about such a sensitive subject with what DG and I call our "warped sense of humour" but I've long since come to the conclusion that laughter is better for me than yet more tears so I try to see the funny side to everything. After all, what I say is probably a much toned down version of what hubby would have said, if I'd gone first - I've never met and will never meet such a positive cheerful person ever again so I try to follow in his footsteps.

Lots of love to you all. Looking forward to reading your next chapter Mo. My hubby's dietician was as skinny as a rake - literally- and my hubby's reaction to her advice was, I'm not going to listen to that, hardly an advertisement for healthy living! xxx

Justamo
Posts: 463
Joined: Sun Sep 04, 2016 9:38 pm

Re: Thanks for sharing your experiences . . .

Postby Justamo » Sat Sep 24, 2016 1:46 pm

Proud Wife, I do know what you mean about ashes. My parents had moved to Southern Ireland (my mother's birthplace) when they retired, and my dear mum only had a year or so before lung cancer killed her. Dad wasn't a 'local'. and although he lived in the most caring community, I was anxious that he come and live near me so that if his health deteriorated then I could be close.

My mother's wish was to be buried next to her mother, and she was carried to a tiny graveyard which didn't even have a road leading to it. Mum's nephews carried her coffin on their shoulders across a couple of fields to reach the spot. Dad came and lived with Peter and me, and lived, like a lost soul, for seven years. When he died he was cremated, and I took his ashes to Ireland and scattered them on my mum's grave. It was a difficult journey because it was at the height of the IRA bombings and flights into Ireland were the subject of enormous amounts of security. I got a letter from the undertaker describing what was in the large box I was carrying and security was happy with that and didn't make me open it to reveal the contents. The ashes were scattered and I don't mind about not having any of his remains with me. They belonged with my mother. And I've got his little brass screwdriver in my handbag and his bricklaying trowel in the garage. But I have directed that my own ashes be scattered in the same place.

PW, make sure you get a note from the undertaker if you are going to carry ashes through security of any kind. The world is full of people carrying interesting substances with them when they travel and you really don't want a drug dog or ambitious security officer looking for a second stripe challenging you in front of a queue of bored passengers, do you ? And if your cruise ship has a minister of religion aboard then keep schtum (Google just tried to type scrotum - honestly - try it and see) about your additional passenger or he'll take over. They don't have enough to do on board and they love a ceremony of any kind. Do the opposite to Titanic, i.e. go to the blunt end of the boat before you disperse the ashes. Don't get all Kate Winslett about it, will you, it's always breezy up at the sharp end.

I can't speak for the others (not that it stops me trying) about whether this subject causes offence, but you do tell it how it is PW, and after people have been faffing about you while you've dealt with the nitty gritty then you're entitled to take a pragmatic view of things. One tends to drop all pretence and nicety by this stage of the proceedings and if you can't do a bit of plain speaking to us then all hope is lost.

I don't actually put effort into being funny and I never try to see the funny side of anything, but I do sometimes step aside and look at life's quirks from an objective point of view.

And speaking of skinny/fat dieticians, I was accosted by a lady in a well-known-department-store the other day whose eyebrows swooped up into her hairline and whose lipstick formed a bow on her lips that stopped just short of entering each nostril. She asked me if I wanted a 'makeover'. Well, no, actually. So I remembered a pressing engagement (I think it was to choose clothes pegs) at the other end of the shop and exited stage left pretty smartly.

I can't stop long because I've got to go and speak to the cat who is depressed because he thinks he is being neglected. My Patient has put himself back to bed because he had a hypo this morning and feels very 'hungover'. I've got to wash up and shove the hoover about (honestly, you leave foot prints in the dust on the stair carpet at the moment) and then I want to go to Mass at 5-ish, feed and water My Patient when I get back and then try to finish a design I've been mucking about with since June.

So when I've done all that I'll log back on tonight and relate the latest gripping episode in my life.

I love you all to bits. Is it because we are almost at our wits' end that we cling on to this forum as though it was a lifebelt ? Or is it only me ?

speak soon, Love from Mo