A forum for people to support each other after the loss of a loved one

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natters
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Sep 10, 2015 8:15 am

Support Groups

Postby natters » Sun Oct 02, 2016 5:13 pm

Hi, its been 7 months since my wonderful daddy passed away and im finding it hard. We all really miss him. Does anyone know any good support groups or places to go and heal oneself in essex. Im not religous but was told about a sanctuary near where i live, unfortunately the lady has now sold up. My 3 y/o daughter has been on chemo for the last 2 years also & she finishes treatment in Feb 2017. I think everything has taken its toll on me & i feel exhausted. Any tips or advice on how to feel positive & motivated again would be great. Im also dreading xmas as it will be the first one without dad & he loved xmas! :(

N x

Marmalade

Re: Support Groups

Postby Marmalade » Sun Oct 02, 2016 7:08 pm

Hi Nat,

Have you contacted your local hospice? They will know of a range of support groups. There is a link here that may help, for a place called St Lukes hospice who work with MacMillan.

http://www.google.co.uk/urlsa=t&rct=j&q ... GRKYtKm_oQ

It completely understandable that you feel you need a but of support and you deserve it. I don't think anyone has a magic bullet that will make everything right but I understand the exhaustion very well, you live on adrenaline for so long because you have to, that when you finally can rest you can't seem to settle or get enough of it. There are some facts that some don't like to hear, exercise, walking swimming cycling or visits to the gym lifts your mood. It need not be gruelling but should be an effort. It also helps you get better rest. How about joining a walking or cycling group. A new interest may also help, something you can do while you are waiting for appointments might be good but try to think of something that brings you into contact with new people and ideas. How about tracing your Dad's family tree, there are free records on the net and a pad and a pencil to jot down family stories is all you really need to start with. Most areas have a family history group and a tree might be something you could pass on to your daughter. Another lady on here found that her daughter learning to ice-skate helped them both to meet new people and acclimatise to a new part of their life.

I'm sorry you are having a difficult time and that your daughter is also on a scary journey at such a young age. I know you have posted before and its good you can come here and talk about how you are feeling. It takes time to get over these big events and caring is draining so I hope you do try to make contact with a support group, if the one here is not near you they will know one that is.

I wish you a restful evening and peaceful night M xx

natters
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Sep 10, 2015 8:15 am

Re: Support Groups

Postby natters » Sun Oct 02, 2016 8:44 pm

Thank-you for your message & your kindness. I shall look into it all. Life certainly likes to throw up some challenges at times. Hope u r ok too.xx


Marmalade wrote:
> Hi Nat,
>
> Have you contacted your local hospice? They will know of a range of
> support groups. There is a link here that may help, for a place called St
> Lukes hospice who work with MacMillan.
>
>
> http://www.google.co.uk/urlsa=t&rct=j&q ... GRKYtKm_oQ
>
> It completely understandable that you feel you need a but of support and
> you deserve it. I don't think anyone has a magic bullet that will make
> everything right but I understand the exhaustion very well, you live on
> adrenaline for so long because you have to, that when you finally can rest
> you can't seem to settle or get enough of it. There are some facts that
> some don't like to hear, exercise, walking swimming cycling or visits to
> the gym lifts your mood. It need not be gruelling but should be an effort.
> It also helps you get better rest. How about joining a walking or cycling
> group. A new interest may also help, something you can do while you are
> waiting for appointments might be good but try to think of something that
> brings you into contact with new people and ideas. How about tracing your
> Dad's family tree, there are free records on the net and a pad and a pencil
> to jot down family stories is all you really need to start with. Most
> areas have a family history group and a tree might be something you could
> pass on to your daughter. Another lady on here found that her daughter
> learning to ice-skate helped them both to meet new people and acclimatise
> to a new part of their life.
>
> I'm sorry you are having a difficult time and that your daughter is also on
> a scary journey at such a young age. I know you have posted before and its
> good you can come here and talk about how you are feeling. It takes time
> to get over these big events and caring is draining so I hope you do try to
> make contact with a support group, if the one here is not near you they
> will know one that is.
>
> I wish you a restful evening and peaceful night M xx